Clothing


Shell jacketYou need a lightweight and sturdy shell jacket that stows away without taking up much space in your backpack. You should be able to fit the jacket hood over a helmet. 

Mountain pants – Sturdy mountaineering pants of Schöller fabric or other stretchy, weather-resistant material. We are moving quickly, and wearing pants that can “air” out excessive heat through the fabric is needed.

Lightweight shell pants – A pair of very light-shell pants. You might not need these often, but they will act as emergency gear if high winds or bad weather creep in.

Base layers – A long-sleeved base layer top and a short-sleeved base layer t-shirt are a good combination for the upper body. You can change for the dry if one gets sweaty and wet on a walk-in. We must bring long thermal bottoms for cold starts on higher alpine objectives. You don’t need the warmest version, but one that offers enough extra insulation on cold days when layered with your mountain pants.

Mid-layer
– A light fleece sweater or jacket. A hooded version is great for keeping the sun off your neck while walking on the glaciers.

Extra warm layer – A light fibre or down jacket/vest.

Warm hat – Should cover the ears and be thin enough to wear under a helmet.

Neck gaiter / Buff – Something that can warm your neck and protect against wind and bad weather. A “buff” or other balaclavas are great.

Sunhat / Cap – The sun can be very intense on the glaciers. Make sure you have a system to hide from the heat and sun.

Warm gloves – A warmer pair of gloves (best if finger version).

Thinner technical gloves – Lightweight & sturdy.

Note: A pair of gardening/bike/work gloves can be a good third glove. It can be used for a day of Via Ferrata, MTB, etc.

Socks – 2 pairs of socks. We recommend a pair of light trekking socks and a warmer variant for cold weather.

Snow gaiters – We only need the short version for summer use.  You will not need separate snow gaiters if you have a pair of mountaineering boots with an integrated snow gaiter.
The gaiters also protect your pants from crampon accidents.
We might not bring them on the technical climbs.

Trekking, running, or approach shoes – You must bring a pair of normal sports/approach shoes with good soles. Some prefer hiking to the hut in these shoes and carry their mountaineering boots. They will also come in handy if we do a day of Via Ferrata or as an approach to any valley climb.

Shorts – Some prefer wearing shorts to the huts on very warm days.

Extra items


Extras: To reduce the weight of your backpack, the trick is to bring only the important ones.

Personal affairs – Money (cash euro and credit card), passport, insurance card, etc.

Energy-Bars and chocolate

Sunscreen – Choose factors 30-50.

Sun stick – To protect your lips from the sun.

Sunglasses – With side protection, level 4.

Snow goggles / Ski mask – You should bring a mask for windy days.

Water bottles/Tea flask – Sigg or Nalgene bottles are great. One liter + 0,5 liter should be sufficient for most people. If you only fill the bottles with cold drinks, simple “San Pelegrini” or “Badoit” bottles are good enough. If you bring a tea flask, 0.5l is enough and not too heavy.

Hut Items


You only need to bring these items when a hut night is planned.

A sleeping bag liner – Is obligatory in most huts.

Headlamp – A good and bright headlamp that fits on your helmet. Make sure to fit new batteries. New headlamps have a red-light function, which is highly appreciated by fellow climbers when people need to find the toilets during hut nights.

Phone charger – You can most often charge your phone in the hut.

Tooth-brush

Earplugs – For a better night’s sleep in the huts.

Small first-aid – Painkillers (Paracetamol + Ibuprofen), plaster, blister kit (Compeed, sports tape, iodine, small scissor). Don’t bring any more than this unless you have special conditions that require you to take other medicine (make sure to inform us of what you take).

Reading material – You can bring a small book or magazine to read. There is normally a selection of magazines in the huts, but often in French or Italian. But don’t bring a heavy hard-back edition…

Technical Gear


30-35 liter backpack – Should have at least one attachment for an ice-axe. The best is to go for a relatively simple “alpinist” backpack without too many extra straps.

Rain cover – We may approach huts in heavy rain, and a rain cover can be useful.

Mountaineering boots – You need a pair of well-fitting, insulated, and sturdy semi-rigid mountaineering boots that fit crampons easily. You should choose a lightweight summer model that doesn’t have too stiff a sole.

Crampons – The lightest 10-12 point steel crampons you can find. You need anti-balling plates.

Ice axe –
A short and light ice axe (max 50cm long).

Telescopic pole – If needed for hut approach and descent. Bring poles that don’t take up much space when folded. We will leave them in the hut or not bring them when doing harder climbs like the Matterhorn/Eiger.

Helmet – A normal climbing helmet will do. Make sure that there is a good attachment for a headlamp.

Harness  – A light climbing harness + a normal screw karabiner.

2 x Screw karabiners – Normal screw carabiners. Choose light models.

Rappel devise – A normal belay/rappel device.

Prusik loop – A 60cm prusik loop of 6-7mm assescory cord.

1x 120 cm sling – To attach yourself to a belay. A “Petzl connect adjust” loop is perfect.

Rock-climbing shoes – There is a good chance we will do a day of rock-climbing. If you have your shoes, you should bring them. It can also be rented in Chamonix.


*Can be rented in Chamonix.

** We can supply you with some of these items. Let us know what you need.

Group Gear


The guide will provide all protective and safety gear listed below.

Ropes

Protection & safety gear  – Glacier kit, rock protection gear, slings, quick-draws.

First-aid kit – A first-aid kit

Radio – A radio or other means of calling rescue.

This list covers the clothing and equipment needed for the “normal” Matterhorn and Eiger routes.

Even when the conditions are good, and we do these climbs, it can be cold and windy, so it is crucial to have the proper clothing.

You can expect longer sections of rock-scramble and climbing, moving together continuously in a steady flow. It is imperative not to be burdened with heavy equipment.

Both summits have sections of snow and ice, which makes it essential to bring crampons and ice axes.

Remember: Good gear is crucial in putting the odds in your favour. Gear failure can ruin a trip for even the experts.

Shell jacketYou need a lightweight and sturdy shell jacket that stows away without taking up much space in your backpack. You should be able to fit the jacket hood over a helmet. 

Mountain pants – Sturdy mountaineering pants of Schöller fabric or other stretchy, weather-resistant material. We are moving quickly, and wearing pants that can “air” out excessive heat through the fabric is needed.

Lightweight shell pants – A pair of very light-shell pants. You might not need these often, but they will act as emergency gear if high winds or bad weather creep in.

Base layers – A long-sleeved base layer top and a short-sleeved base layer t-shirt are a good combination for the upper body. You can change for the dry if one gets sweaty and wet on a walk-in. We must bring long thermal bottoms for cold starts on higher alpine objectives. You don’t need the warmest version, but one that offers enough extra insulation on cold days when layered with your mountain pants.

Mid-layer
– A light fleece sweater or jacket. A hooded version is great for keeping the sun off your neck while walking on the glaciers.

Extra warm layer – A light fibre or down jacket/vest.

Warm hat – Should cover the ears and be thin enough to wear under a helmet.

Neck gaiter / Buff – Something that can warm your neck and protect against wind and bad weather. A “buff” or other balaclavas are great.

Sunhat / Cap – The sun can be very intense on the glaciers. Make sure you have a system to hide from the heat and sun.

Warm gloves – A warmer pair of gloves (best if finger version).

Thinner technical gloves – Lightweight & sturdy.

Note: A pair of gardening/bike/work gloves can be a good third glove. It can be used for a day of Via Ferrata, MTB, etc.

Socks – 2 pairs of socks. We recommend a pair of light trekking socks and a warmer variant for cold weather.

Snow gaiters – We only need the short version for summer use.  You will not need separate snow gaiters if you have a pair of mountaineering boots with an integrated snow gaiter.
The gaiters also protect your pants from crampon accidents.
We might not bring them on the technical climbs.

Trekking, running, or approach shoes – You must bring a pair of normal sports/approach shoes with good soles. Some prefer hiking to the hut in these shoes and carry their mountaineering boots. They will also come in handy if we do a day of Via Ferrata or as an approach to any valley climb.

Shorts – Some prefer wearing shorts to the huts on very warm days.

30-35 liter backpack – Should have at least one attachment for an ice-axe. The best is to go for a relatively simple “alpinist” backpack without too many extra straps.

Rain cover – We may approach huts in heavy rain, and a rain cover can be useful.

Mountaineering boots – You need a pair of well-fitting, insulated, and sturdy semi-rigid mountaineering boots that fit crampons easily. You should choose a lightweight summer model that doesn’t have too stiff a sole.

Crampons – The lightest 10-12 point steel crampons you can find. You need anti-balling plates.

Ice axe –
A short and light ice axe (max 50cm long).

Telescopic pole – If needed for hut approach and descent. Bring poles that don’t take up much space when folded. We will leave them in the hut or not bring them when doing harder climbs like the Matterhorn/Eiger.

Helmet – A normal climbing helmet will do. Make sure that there is a good attachment for a headlamp.

Harness  – A light climbing harness + a normal screw karabiner.

2 x Screw karabiners – Normal screw carabiners. Choose light models.

Rappel devise – A normal belay/rappel device.

Prusik loop – A 60cm prusik loop of 6-7mm assescory cord.

1x 120 cm sling – To attach yourself to a belay. A “Petzl connect adjust” loop is perfect.

Rock-climbing shoes – There is a good chance we will do a day of rock-climbing. If you have your shoes, you should bring them. It can also be rented in Chamonix.

Extras: To reduce the weight of your backpack, the trick is to bring only the important ones.

Personal affairs – Money (cash euro and credit card), passport, insurance card, etc.

Energy-Bars and chocolate

Sunscreen – Choose factors 30-50.

Sun stick – To protect your lips from the sun.

Sunglasses – With side protection, level 4.

Snow goggles / Ski mask – You should bring a mask for windy days.

Water bottles/Tea flask – Sigg or Nalgene bottles are great. One liter + 0,5 liter should be sufficient for most people. If you only fill the bottles with cold drinks, simple “San Pelegrini” or “Badoit” bottles are good enough. If you bring a tea flask, 0.5l is enough and not too heavy.

You only need to bring these items when a hut night is planned.

A sleeping bag liner – Is obligatory in most huts.

Headlamp – A good and bright headlamp that fits on your helmet. Make sure to fit new batteries. New headlamps have a red-light function, which is highly appreciated by fellow climbers when people need to find the toilets during hut nights.

Phone charger – You can most often charge your phone in the hut.

Tooth-brush

Earplugs – For a better night’s sleep in the huts.

Small first-aid – Painkillers (Paracetamol + Ibuprofen), plaster, blister kit (Compeed, sports tape, iodine, small scissor). Don’t bring any more than this unless you have special conditions that require you to take other medicine (make sure to inform us of what you take).

Reading material – You can bring a small book or magazine to read. There is normally a selection of magazines in the huts, but often in French or Italian. But don’t bring a heavy hard-back edition…

The guide will provide all protective and safety gear listed below.

Ropes

Protection & safety gear  – Glacier kit, rock protection gear, slings, quick-draws.

First-aid kit – A first-aid kit

Radio – A radio or other means of calling rescue.